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  #1  
Old 10.10.2010, 22:45
peterpiper
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Default "disconnect?" over and over

I've been using JDownloader a few weeks. It mostly works but sometimes would crash which the devs say is open-jre's fault. So against my prefererence, I installed Oracle/Sun's jre. Now I just get "Disconnect? Wait ..." every five minutes. I've searched the bugreport forum but don't see this issue addressed. Please let me know if other info is needed.
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  #2  
Old 10.10.2010, 22:53
iMax
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Buddy; I think it is the ISPs...all over the world; they are interrupting ANY KIND OF DOWNLOAD...in the last 2 months
First they will throttle you down and then choke the download.
They are doing this with browser-download too.
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  #3  
Old 11.10.2010, 02:26
peterpiper
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I have no problem downloading through my browser.
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  #4  
Old 16.10.2010, 04:11
JackBlack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iMax View Post
Buddy; I think it is the ISPs...all over the world; they are interrupting ANY KIND OF DOWNLOAD...in the last 2 months
First they will throttle you down and then choke the download.
They are doing this with browser-download too.

By all over the world you mean the USA / UK ?

Cause its working fine here apart from the crashes that jd has been doing lately which is indeed JRE's fault.
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  #5  
Old 16.10.2010, 09:21
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drbits drbits is offline
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@ PeterPiper,
It looks like while picking peppers, you forgot to make sure that your firewall allows JDownloader.exe, java.exe, and javaw.exe to open and write on any port to any IP address. You should also check that these three programs are allowed to listen on any port for local connections.

You are making no connections from JDownloader. Again, there are three programs: jdownloader.exe, java.exe, and javaw.exe.

Also make sure that your security software never reads the data as it is being downloaded. The packet headers should be examined (that is how the firewall works), but scanning the contents will break a program like JDownloader.

The rules request that you post information about your security software and your JD settings.

If you are not sure about security software, read General Discussion -> Self Help Index -> Choosing and installing security software.

Please read the instructions for posting a log that are linked to in my signature.
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  #6  
Old 18.10.2010, 00:36
peterpiper
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drbits, I use Linux not microsoft. As I stated in my post, I used Open Java prior to installing the non-free Java. Other than the random crashing with Open Java, I had no problems with it including making connections and downloading. At no time between switching between the javas did my security settings change (which for what it's worth, allow all outgoing connections).

My firewall is iptables. My java version is 6.21.
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  #7  
Old 18.10.2010, 12:26
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drbits drbits is offline
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There is no difference in terms of firewalls and antiviruses between Linux and Microsoft. All computers need a firewall to detect attacks and stop them. The best firewalls do not run on the computer they are protecting.

Viruses in Linux are like viruses in early MS-DOS. People ignored them, because they weren't common. However, there is no added security in the Linux kernel compared to the Windows kernel. Make sure you obtain a bootable antivirus disk (usually ISO Linux) and scan your system.

You could try reverting to Java 6u17 and see if that helps you.

-----------------------------------

To really find the cause of your crashes, somebody will probably have to use your environment with the JDK debugging tools.

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What do you mean "My firewall is iptables"? Do you mean that you are relying on a blacklist? That is not comparable to a firewall, which uses header information to determine whether sequences of packets are reasonable.

If nothing else, you should be using an intrusion detection system (a program that subscribes to OS events to and warns when event sequences occur that are not compatible with good programming practices (or even common practices).

Summary: If you have no antivirus, you probably have a virus (that is the way the Linux world works). If there is no antivirus and no virus, and JD keeps losing connections with major servers, then you are probably trying to download too many streams at the same time (See General Discussion -> Self Help Index -> Optimizing the number of connections). This is OS independent.

You can also try changing the timeout values, packet size, and total window buffer size in inetd. The proper packet size depends on your type of internet connection. The Window is defined as the number of packets that can be sent from the server to your computer (bandwidth) in the time it takes a message to make a round trip from your computer to the server and back (latency). Even though it is Windows-Centric, you should look at the documentation about Optimizing your connection in the Self Help Index.

For example, if you are using a non-PPP connection, your total packet size is 1500 bytes. Because of overhead, the data area of your packet is 1470 bytes. If you have PPP, then your packet size is 1472 and your data per packet is 1450 bytes.

The maximum internet transmission time (assuming satellite communication between continents) is under 300 ms. This is the worst latency. If you know your upload and download speeds, you can estimate the number of packets per second (for example, if you run use speedtest.net, it will tell you the number of bits per second of net data in both directions. Multiple that by .3 (latency time), by 8/9 to account for overhead and by 128 to convert to KBytes. That is the amount of data you have to buffer to keep a clean internet connection. You round that up to a multiple of the number of data bytes in your packets.

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How large is your system's memory? Check PS to see the size of JD. Make sure it is not being paged or swapped to disk. The buffers to take care of latency are associated with inetd, so they are not swapped except in extreme circumstances. However, jD also relies on a 50KiB buffer per connection inside the program. If that is swapped it could cause trouble.

That is all I can think of at the moment (3:30 AM). Let us know how things go.
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  #8  
Old 19.10.2010, 11:40
remi
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by drbits View Post
...However, there is no added security in the Linux kernel compared to the Windows kernel...
This info is misleading because not all people know what you mean with "kernel".

Linux is much more secure than Windoze because of sound and clever design choices. Please, read "**External links are only visible to Support Staff**.
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